July 6

How to Write a Maid of Honor Speech

Get great tips on writing your maid of honor speech from our guest blogger, Carey, from Dessy Group’s Bridesmaid Blog!

Many years ago I was asked to be a maid of honor in the wedding of a friend who I had lost touch with over the years.  The request in itself was quite a surprise, as we hadn’t spoken in some years, but I thought of it as an honor and accepted. At the time I hadn’t attended any weddings in my adult life and I just didn’t know what to expect.  I was living many states away from the bride-to-be and therefore wasn’t really involved in any of the pre-planning.

The wedding day came, and the ceremony was beautiful. As I sat at the front table with the bride and groom at the reception, suddenly the serenity changed to panic. Abruptly, the microphone was handed to me to give the maid of honor speech. I stood there frozen like a deer in headlights. What?! A speech?! No one ever told me about that part! I fumbled through (I still have no idea what I said to this day!), standing there sweating and wondering if people were cringing at my on-the-spot speech.  I vowed that the next time I would know my responsibilities, and for goodness sake prepare for the speech! Lesson learned.

I’d like to help all of you avoid my painful mistake and leave you with a few helpful tips when it comes to writing your maid of honor speeches:

  • Decide what technique works best for you. Do you want to have humor in your speech, or just stick to the more sentimental type?
  • Don’t go at it on your own. Do talk with the bride about what she would prefer to hear in the speech.
  • Slowly gather thoughts and ideas and write them down. Do this even months in advance so that you have plenty of time to compile, edit and come up with a rough draft.
  • Keep the speech upbeat. If you’ll be telling stories aboutthe bride, make sure they’re not embarrassing ones! If you want to include a funny embarrassing story, be sure to run it by the bride first.
  • Practice, practice, practice. Go through the whole speech in front of a friend and ask for herinput.
  • Put your speech on note cards. Whether you’ll need to look at them or not, it’s nice to have the backup if you find your nerves getting the best of you.
  • When the big day arrives, save the cocktails for after your speech. No need to embarrass yourself. Okay, maybe one glass of wine to help with the jitters.
  • Remember, everyone is there to celebrate and have a good time. No one will be judging you—they’ll be enjoying listening to you speak from your heart!

Meet Carey

Carey Gordon, MBA, is a blogger for The Dessy Group. Originally from the Midwest, her work in Marketing and Communications has taken her to positions abroad in both the UK and Cyprus. She is currently based in Berkeley, CA.

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About Katie

Katie M. is a Writer at Wedding Paper Divas. She has the privilege of viewing nearly every piece of stationery before it goes up on the website, giving her the ultimate inside scoop on upcoming trends in the stationery world. She loves classic designs with a surprising twist, and enjoys finding new ways to express her ever-evolving personal style—a blend of traditional glamour and bohemian whimsy that makes Wedding Paper Divas a perfect fit! In addition to her love for writing, Katie is obsessed with health and fitness, skincare, UC Santa Barbara, all things adorable, the beach, dancing, cooking, getting real mail, fresh flowers, discount shopping, and shoes (who isn’t?). Katie is a contributing editor to Diva Dialogue. Be sure to check out her recurring feature, “Rant or Rave.”

2 thoughts on “How to Write a Maid of Honor Speech

  1. Pingback: Things to Know: Toasting Etiquette « Wedding Invitations, Style, Planning & Inspiration

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